Getting Shouted at is Almost Good for You

Others’ anger makes people work harder not smarter: The effect of observing anger and sarcasm on creative and analytic thinking.

Miron-Spektor, Ella; Efrat-Treister, Dorit; Rafaeli, Anat; Schwarz-Cohen, Orit

Journal of Applied Psychology, May 16, 2011, No Pagination Specified. doi: 10.1037/a0023593

Abstract

The authors examine whether and how observing anger influences thinking processes and problem-solving ability. In 3 studies, the authors show that participants who listened to an angry customer were more successful in solving analytic problems, but less successful in solving creative problems compared with participants who listened to an emotionally neutral customer. In Studies 2 and 3, the authors further show that observing anger communicated through sarcasm enhances complex thinking and solving of creative problems. Prevention orientation is argued to be the latent variable that mediated the effect of observing anger on complex thinking. The present findings help reconcile inconsistent findings in previous research, promote theory about the effects of observing anger and sarcasm, and contribute to understanding the effects of anger in the workplace. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)

via PsycNET – Display Record.

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Comments

  1. Cassandra says:

    Fell out of bed feeling down. This has bigrtehned my day!

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