Natural Gas: The Future.

I’m not in the natgas cornucoppian camp, but this Peter Tertzakian piece is still worth a read. The key is this graph:

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Comments

  1. Campbell says:

    The effects of chemicals from fracturing are exposed to humans on a large scale through the impacted water supplies. Have a look at the film Gasland to get a preview of enjoying safe water being delivered by truck to your home while your well water messes with your livestock.

  2. Danny L says:

    There's a difference between worrying about waste-water contaminating water systems (an issue, but very solvable with current best practices), and worrying about fracking water somehow migrating through a mile of solid rock to acquifers (not an issue).

    Just a note not to kill an extremely important resource out of environmental hysteria.

  3. What defines cornucopia? A 300 year natural gas supply because 100 isn't enough? Even with Quebec and New York off limits, there's abundance. Don't take my word for it, here's a quote from Encana President, Randy Eresman.

    “We’re starting to measure our development inventory in the range of 30, 40 or 50 years, and for an E&P [exploration and production] company historically we would have inventories that we were one or two years ahead of us, if we were lucky.”

    Fuel cells anyone?

  4. Crocodile Chuck says:

    Xylene, toluene, benzene? Suggest you do a little boning up on your chemistry and epidemiology, particularly before posting.

  5. buck smith says:

    If someone takes Xylene, toluene, benzene or uranium, radium or plutonium and injects it into a rock formation a mile or more underground people living above are not harmed. In fact Xylene, toluene, benzene exist naturally in rock formations below ground.

    If a well is badly drilled and the surface casing leaks and fracking fluids leak or are pumped into a surface aquifer that supplies drinking water, that's an accident and is not a normal side effect of oil and gas development with fracking.

  6. johnhhaskell says:

    what's available without fracking is the black area in the columns above – enough to get the price of gas in the US to triple or quadruple, back to where it was in say Feb 06… good thinking