Michael Lewis Goes to Ireland

Title aside, I enjoyed Michael Lewis’s latest in Vanity Fair on Ireland’s bank troubles — considerably more than his previous piece on Greece’s troubles.

A banking system is an act of faith: it survives only for as long as people believe it will. Two weeks earlier the collapse of Lehman Brothers had cast doubt on banks everywhere. Ireland’s banks had not been managed to withstand doubt; they had been managed to exploit blind faith. Now the Irish people finally caught a glimpse of the guy meant to be safeguarding them: the crazy uncle had been sprung from the family cellar. Here he was, on their televisions, insisting that the Irish banks were “resilient” and “more than adequately capitalized” … when everyone in Ireland could see, in the vacant skyscrapers and empty housing developments around them, evidence of bank loans that were not merely bad but insane. “What happened was that everyone in Ireland had the idea that somewhere in Ireland there was a little wise old man who was in charge of the money, and this was the first time they’d ever seen this little man,” says McCarthy. “And then they saw him and said, Who the fuck was that??? Is that the fucking guy who is in charge of the money??? That’s when everyone panicked.”

More here.

 

Related posts:

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  2. Links: Ireland as Hedge Fund, College Troubles, TED, etc.
  3. Michael Lewis Goes to Iceland
  4. Michael Lewis on Father’s Day
  5. Michael Lewis on 60 Minutes