The Trouble with U.S. Healthcare? Too Many Optimists

I’ve said something like the following before, but never so succinctly:

The trouble with health care in America, says Muriel Gillick, a geriatrics expert at Harvard Medical School, is that people want to believe that “there is always a fix.” She argues that the way Medicare is organised encourages too many interventions towards the end of life that may extend the patient’s lifespan only slightly, if at all, and can cause unnecessary suffering. It would often be better, she thinks, not to try so hard to eke out a few more hours or weeks but to concentrate on quality of life. [Emphasis mine]

[via The Economist]

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  4. On the Awfulness of U.S. Healthcare
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