Twilight of the Autocrats: Russia, China and the Financial Crisis

It’s been hard not to notice that Russia and China have been hit harder than most by the current recession/depression. How resilient can their precarious political structures be to the forces let loose by the decline in their economies? A piece in American Prospect touches on that question:

Modern autocracies are very different from those of the past. Rather than ruling by strict ideology, ruthless internal police, and tight control of information, authoritarian regimes like Beijing and Moscow have remained in power primarily by making an implicit bargain with their most critical middle-class citizens — you might not have freedom, but you will have money. As long as the broad middle class, which is where the most dangerous dissent would take hold, is gaining ground economically, the regime is safe.

So while in the West, leaders worry that the global economy faces a second Great Depression, such an economic crisis poses a major threat to some of the world’s most resilient autocracies. A strong economy was their only backstop. Now, starved of the growth that keeps them in power and unable to repress their people as old-fashioned dictators did, these autocracies may have nothing left to fall back on.

More here.

Related posts:

  1. Russia: The Once and Future Crisis
  2. Russia Tries the "What Me? No Crisis" Approach
  3. Big-Screen TVs and the California Power Crisis
  4. Surviving the “Contained Depression”
  5. FBI: Financial Crisis Not Just a Passing Fad