The Fat Head of User-Generated Content

An interesting report last week from a Bear Stearns analyst looked at the trends in the aggregate percentage of U.S. Internet traffic accounted for by the six top user-generated content sites (i.e., Facebook, Myspace, Youtube, Wikipedia, Blogger, and Digg):

  • 2004: 0-1%
  • 2005: 7%
  • 2006: 13%

As opposed to the long tail, let’s call it the “fat head” of Internet content.

[Bear Stears via Barrons]

Related posts:

  1. Reality TV, Journalism, and User-Generated Content
  2. Blogging and Reader-Generated Content
  3. The Web is Your Programming Content
  4. Is Content Undervalued?
  5. The Absurdity of the Multi-Head Shower

Comments

  1. James Harry Schaeffer, Tucker, GA says:

    Ron Paul is the only hope to get America back on track to be a country devoted to allowing freedom and justice to reign! All the other candidates think we need them to take our money, run our lives and get us into every war in the world.

  2. Chris Anderson says:

    Of course those are all Long Tail aggregators–each has a Long Tail of content and participants. The same is true in most other online marketplaces/aggregators, from Amazon to iTunes. The aggregators that win tend to be the ones with the widest choice and thus the longest tail.
    -c

  3. BL says:

    “Fat head”. I like that. Can I steal it?
    And are you sure it was a measure of internet traffic and not web traffic? I’d also be curious to see the stats for bittorrent traffic over the same period.