MBAs Go Contrarian on Google

At the same as a number of engineering friends of mine are leaving Google — most common complaint: too big and bureaucratic — MBAs have declared it to be their employer of choice. Food for thought, n’est-ce pas?

Related posts:

  1. Where the MBAs Went
  2. Henry Mintzberg: MBAs Aren’t Fit to Manage
  3. Stanford MBAs Get Mo’ Money
  4. Twin Peaks and Contrarian Private Equity Indicators
  5. MBAs Rule

Comments

  1. whoops. says:

    When I graduated from my MBA program 3 years ago, I turned down an offer from Google. The reasoning was this:
    1. Chaotic operating environment — too many experiments without expectations to justify or measurements to validate them…
    2. …which was technically impossible because everyone rolled up into one massive P&L
    3. Too many battlefield-promoted ‘directors’ who hadn’t actually managed before… none of whom i’d think of as viable mentors
    4. Close to the IPO, and thus…
    5. …option strike too close to the IPO offering price
    and therefore “all the money that’s going to be made there has already been made” — great news for my buddy who joined 18 months earlier, but it was a pass for me.
    Man was that a dumb decision.
    I made a decision even more contrarian at the time — to go to a VC firm and invest in software companies.
    That’s increasingly looking even dumber than passing on Google.
    ahh well — live and learn!

  2. eas says:

    Reminds me a of a 3 year old article from Slate about a study that found that when a sector becomes attracts a ~1/3 of HBS’s graduating class, the sector is due for a downturn: http://www.slate.com/id/2109982/

  3. I hadn’t seen that one, so thanks for the link. There is a similar piece in Forbes from late last year http://members.forbes.com/forbes/2006/1127/048b.html.

  4. Shefaly says:

    Doesn’t surprise me in the least.
    “…Chaotic operating environment — too many experiments without expectations to justify or measurements to validate them…”
    I had about 2 or 3 classmates for company when I accepted a job in a growing IT firm with a similar chaotic environment, the kind that Whoops declined, after my MBA many years ago. That was an experience which has all but rendered me unemployable in the ordinary world, because I now look for similar challenge and opportunity for creativity, responsibility and reward (for finding structure in chaos), autonomy and accountability. I work therefore with start-ups because nothing fazes me and I can keep a calm head, while helping with things that are important not urgent, that will create more value than just reduce noise, and in life too, this well-developed quality helps tremendously.
    If more MBAs really wanted to be the change-agents they fancy themselves, the world would be a better place.

  5. Jim Rogers talked about this concept years and years ago. Its really been a foolproof indicator. I think its a given that google is set for problems since they haven’t diversified very well, and the private equity hedge fund bubble is pretty obvious. the only question is when and how it is popped.

  6. bongo shaftsbury says:

    It’s only negative if Google caves in and hires these tools.
    “If more MBAs really wanted to be the change-agents they fancy themselves, the world would be a better place.”
    They don’t want to change the world. They want a big salary. And yes I have an MBA. But also a Ph.D. :)

  7. Shefaly says:

    Bongo – me too! My PhD is a few weeks away. I am also an engineer. 8-) As for bigger salaries, smart ones know that one can make that big salary with a few days’ work each month rather than 80-hour weeks.
    By the way, Google IS hiring these ‘tools’. In larger numbers than before.