The YouTube Warner Deal

There are two aspects to the big YouTube/Warner deal that interest me. While it’s a fine thing, and it’s nice to see a traditional media company kinda play nice b y sharing music videos with the bratty kidz at YouTube, I’ll still note the following:

  • On the plu side, Warner has done something potentially game-changing in saying that people can take Warner video content and mash it up as they see fit
  • On the minus side, consumer creators still get the short end of the stick, with it not being obvious how they get paid for their mash-up offerings

Related posts:

  1. AOL Time-Warner — Then and Now
  2. Paramount & Time-Warner AOL
  3. YouTube has the Power to Cloud Media Minds
  4. vMix vs Youtube
  5. Cisco Hearts YouTube

Comments

  1. bryan james says:

    Re: “On the plus side, Warner has done something potentially
    game-changing in saying that people can take Warner video content and
    mash it up as they see fit.”
    I’ve just had my YouTube account closed, and videos removed as a
    result of complaints by Warners. (Previously they requested a video of
    mine removed that contained a single image from a Warner Bros film – a
    shot of Doris Day in “Calamity Jane!)
    YouTube emailed me at the weekend:
    “This is to notify you that we have removed or disabled access to the
    following material as a result of a third-party notification by Warner
    Bros. Entertainment Inc. claiming that this material is infringing:
    swingtime – the real tuesday weld: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUHd2ZL1oP0
    The strange thing is the music is by a band I know, The Real Tuesday
    Weld, who gave me permission to use the music track and the film
    content is a couple of minutes from a film by Jacques Tati, – credited
    and the seen by me as a tribute. The film is owned by the BFI (British
    Film Institute) so in neither case has this anything to do with
    Warners. So what is going on?
    Assuming there is a ‘slight breach’ of copyright in the strictest
    sense – are we not allowed to play with the toys we have spent so much
    money on over the years? Can using a minute or two from a film that is
    virtually in the public domain do any damage? Why can’t they see it as
    promotion? They are continuously bombarding us with trailers to
    advertise their products, you’d think they would welcome the help.
    I see this as control freakery of the highest order.
    The video is still on YouTube’s new owner, Google -
    http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=-867566750860222423
    A paradox? I can see hundreds of videos on YouTube that technically
    infringe copyright – why can’t these multimedia giants cut us, their
    customers, a bit of slack. It’s like a pop star abusing their fans.
    I’ve ended up thinking a lot less of YouTube and Warner Bros as a
    result.