Stop Talking About the Weather and Do Something About It

I want to see more weather companies, startups or otherwise. I’ve
always been fascinated by weather, and I stop on the spot when I see
some new online service — which happens much less often than I wish it
would. And I’m not alone.

Example: Since writing recently about realtime weather data
at Weather Underground I’ve seen staggering amounts of referrer traffic
through Google from people looking for “realtime weather”. I’m
apparently not the only one interested in getting weather data, as it
happens.

So, bring on the weather startups. I’ve called for
more people to do stuff in this area before — where is the weather
Digg? where are useful P2P observation networks? and there are many
other ideas — but to no avail. Mike Moritz of Sequoia put it best two years ago when he (lucky bastard) invested in WeatherBug:

There is one universal topic. It isn’t sex, money, or health. It’s weather.

I couldn’t agree more. I want entrepreneurs to stop talking about the weather and do something about it. Please.

Related posts:

  1. Realtime Weather
  2. Making Money from the Weather
  3. More Fun with Weather
  4. More Data for Weather Geeks
  5. Weather Info Porn

Comments

  1. Ben Casnocha says:

    Talking about the weather is a good topic of conversastion:
    http://ben.casnocha.com/2006/09/talking_about_t.html

  2. Chris Kerns says:

    Can you elaborate on where you see the need?
    Weather data is available feely and easily and is pretty much real time through the National Weather Service. I believe most real time weather data is collected through airports in the “METAR” format, and this is dissemenated through the government. The biggest problem with METAR data is that it is only reported hourly unless there is a major change, even though stations are monitoring the weather continuously.
    So, are you looking for new weather data sources? Or different/better distribution channels of existing data? From a business point of view, I would guess that the biggest paying customers of real time weather data are pilots and/or airlines, and they already have several options to choose from to include getting it via XM into their cockpits
    So, I’m curious as to what other forms of real time weather would you be interested in seeing?
    Thanks,
    Chris

  3. dan putt says:

    I couldn’t agree more with your call for more weather related startups. I’m a huge weather fan, subscribing across the board to a number of weather email lists and blogs. I’ve developed a few weather community relate concepts in the past in the brainstorm phase, but never went anywhere with it.
    I think there are great opportunities to involve the passionate weather fan base in more comprehensive data collection, video footage, even forecasting (utilize wisdom of crowd approach to analyze forecast models or even utilize enthusiasts computing power with SETI@HOME style grid computing system to build a more powerful forecast model). I also new formats for weather delivery, weather video archives (collected by users), and extremely targeted local forecasting. Exciting stuff!

  4. Dan Gemperle says:

    I’m also a weather fan and surprized we have not seen better offerings from the big guys like weather.com. Seems like they all provide the same info as each other and NWS website. The one website that gives me something different is sailflow.com, which I use for sailing. They have their own unique weather stations along the coast and some other good data. I noticed the main company, Weatherflow, seems to do most of their work with business or goverment clients (based on perusing their website). Just checked and they dont have any info on investor relations. How does one find out if company’s like this have investment opportunities?

  5. Matt says:

    It seems like the next stage in weather is integrating it in all sorts of other web applications. While there are already many destination weather sites, that’s not really the sweet spot of weather data communication. It’s when you’re planning your next golf game, flight plan, long drive, etc. and a the application suggests to you where or when to do such events. A really simple example is Google showing the weather in their calendar, for each day. http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2006/09/google-calendar-does-something-about.html

  6. philter says: