Euronext and Famous Franco-German Solutions

French president Jacques Chirac commented today that he prefers a “Franco-German solution” — a merger with the Deutsche exchange — to the current agreed merger between Euronext and the NYSE. His musing got got me thinking about famous prior France/Germany collaborations, like the Franco-German Wars. Feel free to add others, of course.

Related posts:

  1. Bruce Sterling on Wrecked Beach Homes of the Rich & Famous
  2. Frank (Quattrone) is Free
  3. Richard Branson as Dr. Yes
  4. Skype Guts Telecom (Again)
  5. Hiding the Elephant

Comments

  1. Paul Kennedy says:

    How about:
    Konrad Adenauer and Charles De Gaulle
    The European Steel and Coal Community
    Airbus
    click… unsubscribed

  2. Apparently Franco/German collaborations are a hot button for more people than Jacques Chirac.
    Anyway, Airbus is a fascinating example of France and Germany working together: They both agree that ongoing subsidies are required.
    As an aside, I don’t think I’ll ever get the whole “click … unsubscribed” thing, but that’s just me.

  3. Did you see all my web sites here in the polish nets ???
    http://www.zaczynamy.za.pl, as well as the “www.wygrywamy.za.pl” and also the “www.nobilitacja.za.pl” – and the “www.projekt-f.za.pl”,
    - Wojciech Dach in Poland, http://www.wygrywamy.za.pl // 0048 502 911 399, //

  4. I may be reading too much into Paul Kennedy’s comment but I think his point is that almost the history of the EU over the last 60 years has been about Franco-German co-operation, except for the last ten years, which is why Chirac is keen to drum up some nostalgia from the past.
    The whole design of the early EU was centred on the idea of France and Germany being joined at the hip to stop any further wars. It gave the two countries massive power in the union, only broken recently by enlargement and by the need of Germany to pay for reunification rather than subsidise grandiose, Franco-centric masterplans within the EU.
    Depending on how you like your EU history try either European Integration 1950-2003 by John Gillingham (who is actually based in St Louis) or, for the much more sceptical treatment, The Rotten Heart of Europe, by Bernard Connolly, a former EU economist.

  5. Ben says:

    Looking at the EU from the distance I thought that it’s always been German-centric more than Franko-centric.