Henry Kravis vs. The Economist

Sometimes The Economist is really smart, and sometimes it is just preachy without a purpose. You see much more of the latter in the current issue’s profile of private equity’s Henry Kravis of KKR fame. After meandering idly through Kravis’s history — Henry makes money! Henry makes more money! Henry makes even more money! — the magazine comes to a sputtering stop.

The trouble is, The Economist being The Economist, it has this compulsion to close with a provocative recommendation. And its recommendation? That the super-successful Kravis should retire. Gee, thanks guys. Maybe your leader should resign. Oh wait, he already is.

Related posts:

  1. Economist Levitt wins the Clark
  2. The Trouble with Henry
  3. Henry Mintzberg: MBAs Aren’t Fit to Manage
  4. Milton Friedman: The Economist in Winter
  5. Henry Blodget, Michael Lewis, and Vampires

Comments

  1. Ben Casnocha says:

    You are right about this tendency of the Economist, Paul. But in a world where most static media is bland and uninteresting, I will always vote for more provocative, even if it’s little much sometimes.

  2. Chris Yeh says:

    As I recall, the Economist’s point was simply that times are likely to be tougher in the private equity world in the future, and that Henry Kravis could certainly retire now and go out on top.
    But it struck me simply as the Economist’s usual cheekiness; I don’t think that the article seriously recommended retirement for Henry.