First-Time Entrepreneurs Can’t Sell Too Soon

According to Jason, first-time entrepreneurs can’t sell too soon. Granted, it’s an insanely broad statement, but it’s a provocative one with which I agree more than I disagree. Too many people wait for a non-existent fourth buyout offer.

Any contrary views out there?

Related posts:

  1. How Entrepreneurs and VCs View Time Differently
  2. Is Time Too Worried About Kids for Its Own Good
  3. Craig(slist) Didn’t Want to Sell?
  4. Contrarian Thinking on Buyouts and VC
  5. The ABCs of Downgrading Google to “Sell”

Comments

  1. John K says:

    Everything he says about founders could easily apply to employees of new IPOs whose stock options are 99% of their wealth.
    The number of people that hold on too long is very high.
    To paraphrase Alec Baldwin in Glen Garry, Glen Ross:
    ABS – Always Be Selling.

  2. Good analogy (and good Glengary Glen Ross cite). In both cases people have too much vested in the venture and end up making bad decisions.

  3. markus says:

    I get a buyout offer at least once a month. The way is see it is if your companies earnings are constantly increasing there is no need to sell. If you are a company that has a bookmarking site or some other web 2.0 what is a business model company then you should take the first big offer that comes along.

  4. Jeff Osborne says:

    Jason concludes by saying “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take”.
    Right. And success is a journey, not some cheezy poster from the mall.
    Jason makes an interesting point, and yes, it’s not hard to mostly agree, but what about people who like to play the possession game? It’s march madness baby, think Princeton, ball control offense. Yeah it’s boring to watch, but a V’s a V.
    An even better argument against comes from the people who aren’t thinking exclusively about the financial bottom line in isolation of all the other functions that their venture provides. Many people are successful because they understand that their business plays a role in their community. Selling out can often create a conflict of values.
    And once it’s done it’s done, no turning back, you’ll always wonder if you could have done it the way it was really meant to be done. Or maybe you won’t. It sure depends on the circumstance. Check out “Capote” for a good contemporary illustration of what I’m getting at.

  5. Joe Agliozzo says:

    I believe it’s ABC – Always Be Closing.