Living Downwind from China

From today’s N.Y. Times and an article on China’s boom in pollution production:

Nor does China’s air pollution respect borders: on certain days almost
25 percent of the particulate matter clotting the skies above Los
Angeles can be traced to China, according to the United States
Environmental Protection Agency. Environmental experts in California
predict that China could eventually account for roughly a third of the
state’s air pollution.

[via BoingBoing]

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  3. The Elephant in the VC Living Room
  4. What Would We Do Without China?
  5. Sobig and SARS: China as virus ground zero

Comments

  1. mistere says:

    Another reason why KYOTO is worthless.. china and india not covered!

  2. Michael Robinson says:

    “on certain days almost 25 percent of the particulate matter clotting the skies above Los Angeles can be traced to China, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency”
    Flag on the play.
    On which days?
    “In 1998, the Asian dust storm was so severe in California that it nearly exceeded federal health thresholds for small
    particles, Cahill said. “It can get pretty nasty here, but the real problem is in China and Asia,” Cahill said. “When you
    travel around in Asia in the spring, it can be pretty depressing. The sky is bright brown.” To some extent, Asia’s dust
    storms are a force of nature, as old as the deserts and not without ecological benefit.”
    http://www.foundryccma.org/Links/ChinaPollutants.pdf
    Also, this:
    “The air problem could become a major embarrassment if, as some experts believe, Beijing does not meet its environmental targets for 2008, when the Olympic Games will be played here.”
    There will be no embarrassment.
    I have a panoramic view of the Beijing skyline both at home and at the office. I am probably more familiar with Beijing air quality than I am with the back of my hand. I certainly spend more time looking at it.
    Three days ago, the air was shockingly clear. This was, not coincidentally, the first day of the Chinese Spring Festival, when all the migrants had left for their hometowns, and everything was shut down, and no one was going out. In fact the few other times the air has been that clear included the height of the SARS scare, and the last visit of the Olympic site selection ommittee prior to the vote for the site of the 2008 games.
    During the Olympics, the government will simply do what they did on that occasion five years ago: shut everything down and send everyone home. It may not be cleaner than the Sydney games, but it will certainly be cleaner than Los Angeles or Mexico City.