Google, the DoJ, and Why Orwell Was Early

The former head of the U.S. Justice Department’s computer crime unit has written a scathing editorial on the DoJ’s subpoena to Google for search results. It is thoughtful and well worth reading:

The Google subpoena fight isn’t really about the anonymous data at issue here today. It is really about the way the government can “deputize” unwilling
private companies who collect and maintain massive databases to act as their
agents in the future. … Let’s just create a single massive database
of what everyone is doing all the time, and let anyone “dip” into it whenever it
is deemed to be relevant to settling some dispute.

It seems Orwell was
off by about 22 years.

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