The ICANN/Verisign Monopoly Thing

The various lawsuits leveled yesterday in San Jose District Court against Verisign for monopolistic behavior in domain registration markets are good and meaty reading. Try this one on for size:

As a result of the conduct alleged herein, Verisign and its co-conspirator, ICANN, control 100% of the .com and .net market. This control coupled with the ability of Verisign to charge $6 plus 7% annually going forward for .com and .net domain name registration results in a dangerous likelihood that Verisign will monopolize the .com and .net domain name registration market.

[Emphasis added]

Related posts:

  1. What if the Cost of Domain Registration was Zero?
  2. Rethinking Domain Names
  3. Whooo, We Have a Domain on That Internet Thing!
  4. Nick Leeson, Liu Qibing, & the Rogue Trader Thing
  5. This Internet Thing Could Really Take Off

Comments

  1. I don’t know the details of this case but it does remind me of a meeting I went to in DC when I worked for Register.com.
    The meeting was sort of a protest meeting – kind of an ‘anti-ICANN’ get together. Verisign put on a presentation about anti-trust law which was a brilliant piece of rhetoric. Clearly they were the only monopoly in attendance and they had a history of dictating their terms to the rest of us. In spite of this obvious fact they proceeded to warn the registrars that the biggest threat to an open and competitive marketplace was price fixing on the part of the registrars. The entire presentation covered the legal risks of collusion and made it clear that any discussion that involved working together to reduce wholesale prices put us all in some jeopardy. Brilliant.