On the Merits of Bad Ideas

I’m guessing, perhaps wrongly, that there won’t be any readers of this blog at the event, but on my way to ETech on Tuesday I’m giving a talk Monday in San Diego at the American Chemical Society annual meeting. The subject? The importance of bad ideas in creating good business ventures.

Here is the penultimate slide, just so people get a sense of where I’m going:

“The two most important tools an architect has are the eraser in the drawing room and the sledge hammer on the construction site.”
       – Frank Lloyd Wright

Mind you, it’s not quite as banal as simply praising the virtues of “failing faster”, although that’s admittedly part of it. I’m more interested, however, in comparing good bad ideas and bad good ideas, and explaining why the former is so much better than the latter.

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Comments

  1. Lloyd Alter says:

    His other line was good too:
    “Doctors are lucky- they get to bury their mistakes- Architects can only plant vines.”

  2. Canuckflack says:

    Measure twice, cut once, and always record everything

    Lifted from Paul Kedrosky: “The two most important tools an architect has are the eraser in the drawing room and the sledge hammer on the construction site.” – Frank Lloyd Wright Whereas a public relations screw-up will live on forever in Factiva….