RSS at Economist and FT (plus a peek at my feeds)

In case folks had missed it, both the Financial Times and the Economist now have RSS feeds.
On a related note, I just checked to see how many feed subscriptions I currently have in my reader. The answer? 271. Yikes. While that might seem daunting — okay, it is daunting — I do overlay the set with a number of watch channels (i.e., ego, technologies, companies, people, and so on) in Feeddemon, so I don’t always make it past the keyword collections created by Feeddemon at my behest. Nevertheless, surprised myself somewhat with the length of the list.

Related posts:

  1. Full-Text Feeds
  2. FeedDemon and Bloglines: Guns and Butter
  3. FeedDemon, RSS, and Degrees of Connectedness
  4. WSJ Launches RSS Feeds
  5. What Would we do Without the Economist?

Comments

  1. b7j0c says:

    Two more ways to get droll commentary from wannabe neocons. Tally-ho! More reivetting defenses of privatized healthcare, Iraq, and the abolishment of taxation.

  2. Chris Stiles says:

    Actually, that’s balderdash. Both these papers may be owned by the same parent company – Pearson – but their editorial slants are quite different.
    The Economist is – mostly – ideologically a pro free market newspaper. In the past, to the extent they’ve supported the US it has seemed to be because it’s a posterchild for the particular brand of free market remedies they support. Their journalists have always been a mixed bunch – for instance their Southern Africa correspondent was for some time shared with the Guardian. Ever since their redesign the quality of their copy has fallen – but it still wins out for sheer breath of coverage. They also seem to have lost their objectivity, and the poster child has become their raison d’etre – nearly inevitable given that the US now accounts for well over half their sales.
    The Financial Times on the other hand is an interesting anomaly. Whilst printed on paper that calls to mind the WSJ, in many ways it’s the least ideological of the British broadsheets. It’s also probably the only major business paper in the world in which you are likely to encounter critiques of the capitalist system.
    Neither are particular neocon – their policies have been more or less the same for the last 100 or so years – and they’ve never flirted with marxism. If you are going to comment, at least do so with a little more knowledge.

  3. b7j0c says:

    i have conjecture, you have conjecture…except you (wrongly) call yours fact. yawn, another mediaphile.