Mary Meeker, Footers, and Fonts

Many folks are passing around the link to analyst Mark Meeker of Morgan Stanley’s new report that high-fives syndication technologies. I have to confess that while it was fine, and had some decent examples, it didn’t really do all that much for me, other than confirm what I already knew (and wrote about more colorfully in Harvard Business Review last June).

More interesting, at least to me, was what was contained in the largest font on every page. Not headers, not pictures –no, this:

In the footer of every page of Meeker’s 21-page report is the above disclosure. In reading the report it jumps out at least as much as does the body of the report itself. And not only that, but the 21-page report effectively ends on page 16, with most of the last four pages devoted to reasons why investors shouldn’t expect that anything in the report is anything other than whimsical.

What fun.

Related posts:

  1. Scandal watch update: Mary Meeker
  2. The Return of Mary Meeker
  3. Mary Meeker Strikes Again
  4. The Hot Product Hail-Mary
  5. The trouble with Mary

Comments

  1. C. Maoxian says:

    You obviously don’t read much Wall Street research… open any report from any firm and you’ll see more or less the same thing.

  2. A Kim says:

    Could you provide a link with free access to your report in the Harvard Business Review? The current access is paid access.
    Keep up the good work!

  3. Paul K. says:

    Sadly, I do read a great deal of Wall Street research. It just struck me as entertaining how overly large the disclaimer was in the MS report …

  4. David Ascher says:

    Funny — I read your blog through an aggregator, and what I noticed today is that the new amazon ads that feedburner puts in your feed jump out _more_ than the content, and make me want to write a ‘deburner’ script, so I can defang the content.
    My take on advertising in blogs is as follows — if you put specific books on your blog, I’ll take them as recommendations, and I’m more likely to buy through you than through another channel because I want to encourage your publishing. In feeds, however, the ads aren’t recommendations — they’re just “related”, and they’re much more ‘in my face’. Making the feed that much closer to being qualified as noise, which is a shame.
    –david