Business Professor & Dumb Clods

A Texas business professor has managed to alienate his town of Alpine, Texas, and a good chunk of the state by calling his students “clods”. The article is “A Strange Little Town in Texas”, and it has led to death threats and to his home being vandalized.

Larry Sechrest, a professor at Sul Ross State University, published the piece in the January issue of Liberty, a tiny libertarian journal with a circulation of around 10,000 — and only two Alpine subscribers, one of whom is Dr. Sechrest. People apparently still got wind of what he said in the piece, not all of which was flattering:

“…the students at Sul Ross, and more generally, the long-term residents of the entire area, are appallingly ignorant, irrational, anti-intellectual, and, well, . . . just plain stupid.”

And he continued:

“[I am] prepared to defend to the death the proposition that Sul Ross, and this area of Texas more generally, is the proud home of some of the dumbest clods on the planet.”

Speaking as someone who has spent a lot of time teaching at business schools, many students are clods. That said, a lot of people everywhere are clods, so I’m not sure students are all that different from the rest of us. I guess we will have to wait for the inevitable paper settling the issue in the Academy of Management’s Learning and Education journal: “Dumbest Clods: A Cross-Cultural Logit Study”.

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Comments

  1. bill pocock says:

    Paul:
    As a former UBC MBA student of yours I’d have to agree with your comment, “…many students are clods”. Would you care to comment on your MBA student performance criteria in terms of quality categories, efficiency, effectiveness?…
    I’d be willing to submit to your proposed “Dumbest Clods: A Cross-Cultural Logit Study” as a non-student. That is, if my personal results aren’t identified (especially to myself). All I’ve got are my self-delusions, and M. Sartre suggests that’s more virtue than vice. Non?
    Bill

  2. Paul K says:

    Hey Bill. Nice to hear from you. I appreciate the offer, and I’ll see what I can do to get you involved. I’m tired of business plan competition, so competing at “clod-ishness” sounds much more interesting to me.
    Hope things are well.

  3. bill pocock says:

    That’s a contest I might win!
    Your words increase my wellness.
    B